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  • bend radius for keg to tap line

    first off, I would like to say cheers to this site awesome products and great knowledge is always available. I bought a kit off of this site the standard kegerator fridge conversion kit it arrived super fast due to their shipping locations in the states. kudos! I installed it with the 10lb aluminum tank and dual gauge regulator . my fridge has a sloped rear on the bottom so i had to cut 2 1x6 boards to use to hold the keg up off of the bottom.
    In doing this it puts a bend in the keg to tap handle line above the keg due to height restriction. now to my question. will this cause the foam I am getting or is it the fact that i am keeping the reg pressure at 5psi ?

    I have tried 10 psi and i still get alot of foam. does the foam go away or will it get worse the closer i get to 12 psi? BTW.. I live in south florida near sea level.

    everything I have read states 12-14psi. but my gut tells me that if i am getting foam at 5psi that it will only get worse with more pressure. i guess thats why most people have foaming troubles.

  • #2
    Make sure you have enough line to give proper restriction. As long as the line isn't kinked or doesn't have any sharp bends you should be fine.

    The 5 psi is way too low. It could be causing the co2 to come out of solution in the lime causing foaming. And that low of pressure will certainly cause the keg to go flat.
    Malt is the soul of beer... and yeast gives it life..
    but the kiss of the hop is the vitality of that life!

    My three favorite beers: The one I just had, the one I'm drinking now and the next one I'll have.

    http://kegerator-social-network.micr...bygrouptherapy

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    • #3
      What is the temperature of your beer? Which brand are you dispensing?

      Your gut is wrong. Use the part of your body that got you through science class. Beer has gas and it is directly affected by temperature. Remember what you learned in science - gas expands when heated, contracts when chilled.

      If you have a mainstream product @ 2.6 volumes of gas @ 38F beer temperature, Apply 14 PSIG. Your kit should have included five feet of 3/16" inside diameter beer line. This should be fine for this pressure setting.

      As long as this beer line is not kinked, this will not cause any dispensing issues. Warm beer and the wrong pressure will.
      Scott Zuhse, Instructor Micro Matic Dispense Institute

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      • #4
        I had that same problem till I bought the right piece and no worry's of wasting good beer. http://www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-...pid-FT872.html
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          everyone needs

          to read Scott's Blog!
          http://www.micromatic.com/keg-beer-blog/
          I cool my tower with Beer.
          http://www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-...-cid-2297.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Scott Zuhse View Post
            What is the temperature of your beer? Which brand are you dispensing?

            Your gut is wrong. Use the part of your body that got you through science class. Beer has gas and it is directly affected by temperature. Remember what you learned in science - gas expands when heated, contracts when chilled.

            If you have a mainstream product @ 2.6 volumes of gas @ 38F beer temperature, Apply 14 PSIG. Your kit should have included five feet of 3/16" inside diameter beer line. This should be fine for this pressure setting.

            As long as this beer line is not kinked, this will not cause any dispensing issues. Warm beer and the wrong pressure will.

            thanks, i shouldn't trust my gut anyway. it's full of beer....LOL!
            i appreciate the quick reply's. it is a hlf keg of michelob amber bock. the temp i recorded from an ambient temp glass on a second pour read 40 degrees with micromatics $9 analog guage my fridgerator is on max cool setting and is under a covered patio in the rear of my house i also purchased a digital temp guage that has a lead that is placed inside the fridge and it reads from 35- 40 depending on outside temp so i can't get it to 38 unless i buy a new fridge. I now have found that i only get foam on the first beer after that it seems managed.

            So my thinking is if i go to 14psi and it never settles and foams constantly am i right in thinking it is then the temp of the beer? which i cannot get it any lower therefore go with less psi?

            is 40 to warm?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by iracmine View Post
              I had that same problem till I bought the right piece and no worry's of wasting good beer. http://www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-...pid-FT872.html
              were you getting foamy beer with bubbles in the line?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bonefish View Post
                thanks, I never realized how much there was to this. but in a pursuit to find the ultimate home beer experience I must do my duty to do it properly. thanks again you guys rock!

                Comment


                • #9
                  First, calibrate both of your thermometers. It is quite simple. Fill a glass with ice (crushed), then water. Pack more ice in the glass after adding the water. Place both thermometers in the ice water.

                  The dial pocket thermometer can be adjusted to reflect the 32F. While in the ice water, hold the dial cover with a pliers while turning the nut behind the dial. Move the pointer to 32F.

                  Some of the digital thermometers have a calibration process. Check the package for instructions. Otherwise, fudge whatever degree(s) necessary.

                  Conduct a search for fans on the forum. You will find many posts on circulating the air in the refrigerator to acquire a more consistent temperature.

                  Be certain that your refrigerator is operating properly. Clean the condenser. 40F is not the end of the world but will require 15 PSIG versus 14. 38F is ideal.

                  Take pictures of your system and post.
                  Scott Zuhse, Instructor Micro Matic Dispense Institute

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    thanks for your help, I went home last night and turned the pressure up to 14psi and calibrated my analog temp probes,( i purchased two, one from micromatic and one from harbor freight tools) the one i purchased from micromatic site was dead nuts accurate so the beer is hovering between 39-40 degree mark .

                    now that i turned the pressure up it raises another question.
                    how long does it take for the beer to absorb the increased gas pressure?
                    is it right away or does it take some time? sorry i must have slept through that part of science.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by raptor131 View Post
                      were you getting foamy beer with bubbles in the line?
                      no. the keg would not fit otherwise.

                      when i make any adjustments i give it a day.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The beer should never absorb any pressure. This pressure you apply should hopefully keep the gas that is in the beer from breaking out (foam) and push the beer through the system when the faucet is open.

                        The pressure you are adjusting should enter the head-space of the keg rather quickly.
                        Scott Zuhse, Instructor Micro Matic Dispense Institute

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Scott Zuhse View Post
                          The beer should never absorb any pressure. This pressure you apply should hopefully keep the gas that is in the beer from breaking out (foam) and push the beer through the system when the faucet is open.

                          The pressure you are adjusting should enter the head-space of the keg rather quickly.
                          so once the beer is flat. it's flat. and no increase in pressure will save it?

                          in other words if someone was too keep the pressure too low say 5lbs for too long and the beer goes flat, then increasing to say 15lbs will not do anything to carbonate it?

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                          • #14
                            Just as the CO2 equalizes and leaves solution under lower pressures, higher pressures will cause it to re-enter solution.

                            This takes time, and is an art that the brewers have mastered using their experience and also sometimes assisted by equipment from Zahm Nagel to determine the ideal level of carbonation. Re-carbonating beer at home, or homebrew style force carbonating is tricky at best, but can be done. Just keep in mind that it takes time for the gas to go back into the liquid, so don't expect results instantly - more on the order of several days.

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                            • #15
                              If you don't want to take time and don't mind a trial and error crap-shoot, you can force carbonate the keg.

                              I used to not be a fan of force carbonation, but I've been doing it lately with my home brews and have been happy with the results. I've been getting the kegs cold, then applying 30 psi to the keg while I sit in a chair with the keg on my lap on its side. Putting the keg on its side exposes more surface area of the beer to co2. I shake the keg while counting to 100 and then put the keg back in the cooler until I'm ready to tap it. Once I'm ready for the new keg, I tap it at regular dispensing pressure.

                              Of course these are five gallon Corney kegs. Doing this with a half barrel commercial keg with an unknown volume of beer remaining in it is going to be more difficult to handle as well as know how long to shake.
                              Malt is the soul of beer... and yeast gives it life..
                              but the kiss of the hop is the vitality of that life!

                              My three favorite beers: The one I just had, the one I'm drinking now and the next one I'll have.

                              http://kegerator-social-network.micr...bygrouptherapy

                              Comment

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