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  • Questions about beer line cleaning as a business

    I have a question with regard to the business of line cleaners. I live in an area where I see a need for a better line cleaning company. Currently, local accounts are getting nothing more than a quick push of PAA and a brush up the faucet. I have an old cleaning pot and the few times I’ve offered help to friends who own bars, it’s been pretty startling. I’m thinking that these folks started out doing a good job, but over the years with the number of accounts they handle, they’ve short cut service to “visit” all accounts. The last thing I’d want to do is put myself in a position where I can’t get to everyone or do the job properly. With all your accounts being different, how many can you service in a day on average? Do you find that working in a two person team makes it easier to take care of customers more efficiently? Are you able to take in to consideration businesses peak hours and avoid showing up in the middle of lunch rush without hindering your own business? How many accounts did you have before recognizing the need for additional employees besides yourself?
    I realize that I’ll need better equipment and some additional training like the MM course, I’m just trying to get a feel for if I can do this right. I’ve a million more questions but don’t want to take advantage of the generous and helpful nature of the people on this site. Finally, are happy with your decision to open a cleaning business? I have a family to take care of and that includes not being an absentee father to my sons. Thank you for your time and any advice.

    Cheers,
    Eric

  • #2
    Eric, The line cleaning business is a very demanding business. You will need professional training and carry a boat load of insurance. The chemicals used in line cleaning are not to be taken lightly, they dissolve proteins, aka skin, eyes, throat, etc. Back in my early career, we had a tech leave line cleaner in the beer line and it was served to a customer. One swallow and off to the emergency room with a call to his lawyer. That being said, good luck!

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    • #3
      I appreciate you taking the time to respond to my questions. I hope I didn't come off as someone who had wrongly thought they had discovered a cake job opportunity. I'm familiar with the chemicals used in cleaning lines. I work in a brewery, using similar products for cleaning and sanitizing of equipment and have cleaned our lines around town. I've just never done more than our one line per account. I'm budgeting on the Micromatic training but if by professional training you suggest I come learn from you, I fit on a standard size couch and pay for my fair share of beer. Just need to get permission from my wife, the most loving supportive woman in the world. I'm looking for the insight that made cleaning efficient and profitable. How many accounts can you do in a day, how do you manage an account with 34 tap with lengths of 125 feet, what type of insurance do you carry above a regular business. Stuff like that. Thanks again for your time.

      Eric

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      • #4
        Go to youtube for a beer line cleaning system that I developed some time ago.I offered it to Micro but got no answer
        The site is boline on youtube.
        let me know what u think
        B

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        • #5
          Guys, what does the actual cost of a call center http://wow24-7.io/call-center as an operating business depend on? Probably it depends not only on the level of equipment but also on the cost of communication channels, the cost of support, team training, the timely response of the supplier to user requests, and other factors. Is that correct?
          Last edited by memding; 05-03-2021, 12:54 AM.

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